Alzheimer’s disease: Caring for the caregiver

Alzheimer’s disease: Caring for the caregiver

“In 2009, nearly 66 million Americans (three in 10 U.S. households) reported at least one person providing unpaid care as a family caregiver,” according to “Caregiver Care,” an article published in the journal American Family Physician. Caring for loved ones has several benefits, including personal fulfillment and satisfaction from helping to relieve another’s suffering. It can bring people together and create a stronger bond. It can be a way of “giving back,” as caregivers were taken care of as children at one time or another.

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Alzheimer’s disease: A healthy life is possible

Alzheimer’s disease: A healthy life is possible

Having a loved one who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease can be frustrating, costly, debilitating and scary. Although no cure currently exists for this specific type of dementia, symptomatic treatments are available and can be helpful. Like with any other illness, the faster the disease is diagnosed and remedied, the lesser the chance the disease will progress to a worsened state. Read more

Immunization Awareness: Vaccinating the elderly

Immunization Awareness: Vaccinating the elderly

According to the United States Census Bureau, individuals aged 65 years and older numbered around 40 million in 2009. That’s just less than 13 percent of the total U.S. population, or roughly one in eight Americans. The Census Bureau also estimates that by 2030, the population of older persons in the U.S. will double from what it was in 2000, climbing to more than 72 million. The elderly are a growing population, and the older people get the more independence they give up and are forced to rely on health care professionals and loved ones for their care.

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Alzheimer’s disease: Recognize these signs and symptoms

Alzheimer’s disease: Recognize these signs and symptoms

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia that affects the individual as well as the person’s loved ones. As a clinical diagnosis — that is, one obtained from signs, symptoms, history or other information that doesn’t include tests — it is extremely important to keep track of anything unusual so that the physician can make an accurate diagnosis. Friends and family should record and report any abnormal changes in the person’s behavior, memory or daily living activities, because the individual affected with Alzheimer’s will most likely be in denial and will not be able to give an accurate and thorough history.

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Alzheimer’s disease: The effects on the person and caregivers

Alzheimer’s disease: The effects on the person and caregivers

The sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease affects approximately 5.3 million people in the U.S. alone, and 1 in 9 Americans aged 65 and older has the disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, which released the 2015 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures. The organization also estimates that the U.S. will spend $226 billion in 2015 on health care, long-term care and hospice services for people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. That figure doesn’t include unpaid care. Dementia is a general term for long-term memory loss and there are many different types, of which Alzheimer’s is the most common. Read more