Substance-induced mental disorders that may make one’s life topsy-turvy

Substance-induced mental disorders that may make one’s life topsy-turvy

There could be various factors causing mental disorders. They include, but are not limited to, genes, environmental influences such as peer pressure and stress, as well as side effects of medication. A major factor responsible for poor mental health, which often gets ignored, is acute or chronic abuse of addiction-forming substances. Drugs or alcohol are an easy means to escape from life’s miseries and ease the pain. Little do people realize that intoxication can create chemical imbalance in the brain causing a mental disorder. Read more

Does marijuana use lead to psychiatric disorders

Does marijuana use lead to psychiatric disorders

Due to a steady decline in the perception of the risks associated with marijuana, a large number of youngsters have been digressing toward this substance. Other major shifts that have exacerbated the situation include the recent public debates on the legalization of marijuana. According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), marijuana is the most widely used illegal drug in the United States, with 22.2 million people abusing it in the past month. The survey also highlighted that the majority of the users are men than women. Read more

Important steps employed during management of co-occurring disorders

Important steps employed during management of co-occurring disorders

When an individual struggle with a substance use disorder (SUD) and a mental illness simultaneously, it is called dual diagnosis. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), in any given year, at least 7-9 million people grapple with a co-occurring disorder. Moreover, 50 percent of the population suffering from an alcohol and drug addiction are also inflicted with a mental illness, such as trauma, depression, personality disorders, anxiety and depression. Read more

US witnessed unprecedented rise in suicides involving opioids in 15 years, study finds

US witnessed unprecedented rise in suicides involving opioids in 15 years, study finds

In 2015, around 33,000 deaths in the United States involved prescription opioids, including prescription drugs and heroin, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The use of opioids to treat chronic pain has increased significantly in all parts of the country. Therefore, researchers have been exploring a possible relationship between access to opioids and increased risk of suicide. There are evidences supporting a correlation between greater use of opioids and increased risk of suicide. A study published in the American Journal of Public Health in March 2017 revealed that suicides involving opioid use have witnessed a two-fold increase over the last 15 years. Read more