Can’t get no satisfaction: The Type A personality is at risk for mental health problems

Can’t get no satisfaction: The Type A personality is at risk for mental health problems

Perhaps everyone has heard of the Type A and Type B personalities. Type A’s are known to be overachievers, competitive in nature, always pressed for time and not surprisingly more stressed and more prone to a heart attack. The Type B personality is more even-keeled and laid-back, and prefers to live in the moment rather than compete for a successful future. Type A’s tend to be successful at work due their drive and dedication. Type B’s can become more successful by setting goals. One is not necessarily better than the other and many people can display qualities of both personality types.

Read more

Vascular dementia: The only type related to lifestyle

Vascular dementia: The only type related to lifestyle

Diseases that affect the heart can also affect the memory. Vascular dementia is a common form of dementia that results in memory loss and confusion due to miniature strokes. These “cortical infarcts” are caused by chronic high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and/or coronary artery disease.

Read more

The wacky, the wild and the worried: The 3 clusters of personality disorders

The wacky, the wild and the worried: The 3 clusters of personality disorders

The young woman who screams and demoralizes people in public because she does not get her way and threatens to cut herself if her boyfriend breaks up with her, the man who believes he can do no wrong because he is highly educated and knows more than everyone else, and the woman who dresses in a tight skirt and stilettos to garner attention at work all have something in common. They all have the distinct characteristics of personality disorders, a diagnosis listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V).

Read more

When the blade cuts too deep: The psychology behind self-inflicted harm

When the blade cuts too deep: The psychology behind self-inflicted harm

“But it helps release the pain / That I go through every day / The blade is sharp and cold / As it runs across my skin / Leaving me to ponder / And decide how deep I cut in.” These are the words from a poem written by Cassandra Johnson, who was addicted to a self-inflicted behavior known as cutting. Cutting, burning and scratching are painful methods of self-harm known as non-suicidal self-injury. Because suicides receive more media attention, less information and statistics are available on self-harm with no intent to commit suicide.

Read more