Important steps employed during management of co-occurring disorders

Important steps employed during management of co-occurring disorders

When an individual struggle with a substance use disorder (SUD) and a mental illness simultaneously, it is called dual diagnosis. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), in any given year, at least 7-9 million people grapple with a co-occurring disorder. Moreover, 50 percent of the population suffering from an alcohol and drug addiction are also inflicted with a mental illness, such as trauma, depression, personality disorders, anxiety and depression. Read more

Dealing with co-occurring bipolar disorder and substance use disorder

Dealing with co-occurring bipolar disorder and substance use disorder

Many people experiencing a mental health condition, such as bipolar disorder or depression, seek refuge in various prescription drugs or illegal substances to counter their debilitating symptoms, oblivious to the fact that such medications can lead to the problem of addiction. In due course, such individuals tend to suffer from both a mental disorder and an addiction, commonly known as dual diagnosis, which can be difficult to diagnose due to the complexity of overlapping symptoms. Read more

Is post-partum depression a trigger for addiction

Is post-partum depression a trigger for addiction

According to the data released by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), in the United States, 11-20 percent of new mothers have postpartum depression disorder (PPD). This figure, however, does not take into account the number of women who suffer miscarriage or deliver stillborn babies. Hence, it is estimated that the actual number of women with PPD can be even higher, if all kinds of pregnancies are taken into account.  Read more

The ‘wild child’ Cluster B personality disorder

The ‘wild child’ Cluster B personality disorder

The “Mr. Know-it-all” at the office who has to have the last word and insists he’s always right, and may even be described as a narcissist. Or the dramatic woman who uses her beauty and allure to get what she wants: the histrionic drama queen. We tend to throw these words around while unaware that narcissistic and histrionic are true personality disorders. These are grouped under Cluster B personality disorders. Many refer to this cluster as “wild.” Cluster B also includes borderline personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder as well as those previously mentioned: histrionic and narcissistic. Read more

The 'wacky' Cluster A personality disorder

The ‘wacky’ Cluster A personality disorder

People with personality disorders have numerous problems in social relationships and mood regulation that are usually present throughout their adult life. In these patients, patterns of perception, thought and response are fixed and inflexible, although their behavior is often unpredictable. Schizoid, schizotypal and paranoid personality disorders are part of the Cluster A group. Individuals in this group are often referred to as wacky, distrustful, suspicious and magical thinkers. These personality disorders should not be confused with the Axis I disorder schizophrenia, which is not a personality disorder but an actual brain disorder that presents with anatomic, neurotransmitter and immune system abnormalities. Personality disorders, on the other hand, are Axis II diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

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